Some Ideas for a Newbie Tweeter

I am always urging people who would listen (and even people who would not ) to blog, tweet or learn Python. A friend of mine, who finally bought into my idea asked me “What should I tweet about”. I wrote a list. I thought it may be useful to others too. So I am sharing it here.
 
I assume that you know your target audience. When you start out, you may not know. Make your best-educated guess but confirm it as you tweet and get responses.
 
  1. Tweet about your professional self. Especially, lessons you learned that you think may be relevant to your audience. 
  2. Tweet about your profession. Talk about what aspects you enjoy most.
  3. Tweet about events. Not just that the event happened but what caused it, what you see as the effect of such events.
  4. Tweet about your learning (related to your profession). 
  5. Advice to my younger self is a nice format in which you can share your insights and wisdom about life. 
  6. Share little bits of knowledge. A one-pager or a paragraph of about a topic in your industry would be a great start.
  7. Share tweets you like. Please annotate it with your observations.
  8. Ask your audience a simple open question and start a conversation. Use a hashtag to watch these conversations. 
  9. Tweet about something worth reading, listening to or watching. Mention why you are recommending it.
  10. Tweet about ideas and trends in your industry and their potential impact. This can be another interesting conversation starter.
Please share your ideas on tweeting. If you write blog posts, please tweet them and use #tweetideas as a hashtag.

5 Reasons Why Should You Host An Hour of Code

I was talking to a group of faculty members at KCG Tech on why we should ask schools to host An Hour of Code.

The Hour of Code started as a one-hour introduction to computer science, designed to demystify “code”, to show that anybody can learn the basics, and to broaden participation in the field of computer science. It has since become a worldwide effort to celebrate computer science, starting with 1-hour coding activities but expanding to all sorts of community efforts.

Here are some reasons why you should be interested in hosting an hour of code or help schools to host it.
  1. This grassroots campaign is supported by over 400 partners and 200,000 educators worldwide.
  2. It is an international movement to get people interested in learning to code.
  3. The first step in teaching programming is to get the learner engaged. Next steps include creating curiosity and giving them a sense of wonder. Show them what they can do with the code in a few minutes.
  4.  Students will do something different and have a lot of fun while learning. In the past couple of instances where we conducted an hour of code, many 7th graders went beyond the hour, refusing to leave the computer lab.
  5. The program will be run mostly by student volunteers and techies. We are trying to get students involved in social causes. We believe the best form for students to learn, is by teaching.

List of 100 – A Great Tool for Thinking

There are several cool tools you can use for thinking.  Two of my favorite ones are Mindmaps and Lists.

List of 100 is a great way to really stretch your mind. Here is how you do it.  Take a problem or idea. Create a list of 100 things that come to your mind. In the case of a problem, it may be a hundred ways to solve it.  In the case of an idea it may be a list of hundred thoughts (typically questions related to – Why, What, Who, When, How, Where).

I first came across the List of 100 here. Since then, I have created lists of 100 individually and in groups. We had great fun doing it and learned a lot. List of 100 is both a thinking tool and a group collaboration tool. Give it a try.