Learning

Restarting My Read Log

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I am restarting my Read Log. A read log is a blog of a list of things I read and find useful. I tweet some of them but Tweets have a short half-life. The inspiration for Read Log comes from different sources – Four short links by Nat, Brain Pickings from Maria, Farnam Street by […]

Inspiration

Little Bits of Knowledge

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I am changing the name of this blog to Little Bits of Knowledge. This blog will be accessible from Little Bits of Knowledge or lbok. There are three reasons for this change. The new name reflects what I want to focus on, going forward. By removing my name, I can have more guests posting in […]

Reading and Reflection

Are You a Multiplier or a Diminisher?

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Liz Wiseman talks about The Power of Not Knowing . She talks about multipliers and how they work. Multipliers are different. Some of the common attributes you can find in multipliers are that: They are supportive They trust people They listen a lot They make you feel important They seek help They give appreciation They get out […]

BookLog

Your Brain and The Concept of Desirable Difficulty

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The struggle and frustration you feel at the edges of your abilities— that uncomfortable burn of “almost, almost”— is the sensation of constructing new neural connections, a phenomenon that the UCLA psychologist Robert Bjork calls “desirable difficulty.” Your brain works just like your muscles: no pain, no gain. The concept is not new. In several […]

Reading and Reflection

Three Posts Worth Reading – On Shifts

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These three posts are certainly worth reading. Why these three? One is a great report on industry shifts from one of the most influential thinkers in the industry. The second is another kind of shift – about the personal experience in shifting from one startup community to another. The third is an interesting shift – […]

BookLog

Adaptive Ignorance

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From this amazing post by Maria The 13 Best Psychology and Philosophy Books of 2013 quoting from On Looking This adaptive ignorance, she argues, is there for a reason — we celebrate it as “concentration” and welcome its way of easing our cognitive overload by allowing us to conserve our precious mental resources only for the stimuli […]

Reading and Reflection

Planning The Unplanned

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I found this really fascinating: All decisions involving uncertainty fall within two dis­tinct categories-those with contingencies, and those with­out. The latter are distinctly more difficult to deal with. Most decisions, and nearly all human interaction, can be incorporated into a contingencies model. For example, a President may start a war, a man may sell his […]