Little Bits of History of my Programming Journey

1972 – I wrote my first program in PDP-8 assembly language

1973-74 – Diagnostics for a clone of PDP-11 called TDC-16, early device drivers (they were called IOCS – input/output control systems). Early programs were written in Machine Language (coded in octal) since no assembler was available, keyed programs into the console using toggle switches (as binary code) and debugged

1974 – Had paper tape – ASR-35 later high-speed reader and mylar tapes

1974 – Debugged device drivers for magnetic tapes and discs, wrote memory diagnostics that detected noise in core memory (and required shielding)

1975 – My First commercial program in assembly language for Bombay stock exchange for matching buys and sells of stocks. The records were punched in cards and fed to the computer, stored in magnetic tapes and matches performed. The memory configuration was a whopping 16KB.

1976 – Taught, RSX-11M (a real-time operating system in PDP-11) at Tata Electric. Wrote first set of PDP-11 program in RSX-11M an operating system for PDP-11

1978 – Learned  operating systems (RT-11, 11M, IAS, RSTS/E) all PDP-11

1978-79 Built the first soap survey program on RSTS/E in Basic Plus (for IMRB)

1979 – Wrote first commercial applications in Cobol (mostly for training others) and several small Basic-Plus utilties. Worked on performance tuning of RSTS/E operating system.

 Patched RSTS/E corrupted disk writing programs in Basic-Plus

1980-81 Wrote commercial programs in Cobol for consulting at Ashok Leyland

1983 – Developed benchmarks in Cobol for Wipro in Cobol

1984 – First C program (a database schema analyzer in Decus C)

1984 – My first Comdex in Las Vegas

1985 – First relational database metadata design as part of Integra SQL development and wrote small C programs mostly for testing the database

1986 – Integra SQL Version -1 with no nested selects, designed and built entirely by reading C.J.Date’s book on Relational Database Systems

1986 – Licensed Integra SQL to SCO (Santa Cruz Operations)

1987 – 1990: C-Trieve (an ISAM file management system), Objectrieve – C-Trieve extended to support Blobs, Licensing of C-Trieve to the White Water Group (they called it WinTrieve)

1991 – Objectrieve/VB was born and exhibited at Comdex May 1991

1992 – DbControls a set of custom controls for building database applications

1993 – Integra VDB – The first relational database set of components. Got covered in the BYTE magazine

1994-1996 – Layered SQL on top of dBase, Paradox, Btrieve (the last one was a project for Varian systems). Most of the coding was writing small examples in C, VB.

1996-2008 Coding winter

2009-Now – Dabbling in Python, little bits of ML, Chatbots

Some Ideas for a Newbie Tweeter

I am always urging people who would listen (and even people who would not ) to blog, tweet or learn Python. A friend of mine, who finally bought into my idea asked me “What should I tweet about”. I wrote a list. I thought it may be useful to others too. So I am sharing it here.
 
I assume that you know your target audience. When you start out, you may not know. Make your best-educated guess but confirm it as you tweet and get responses.
 
  1. Tweet about your professional self. Especially, lessons you learned that you think may be relevant to your audience. 
  2. Tweet about your profession. Talk about what aspects you enjoy most.
  3. Tweet about events. Not just that the event happened but what caused it, what you see as the effect of such events.
  4. Tweet about your learning (related to your profession). 
  5. Advice to my younger self is a nice format in which you can share your insights and wisdom about life. 
  6. Share little bits of knowledge. A one-pager or a paragraph of about a topic in your industry would be a great start.
  7. Share tweets you like. Please annotate it with your observations.
  8. Ask your audience a simple open question and start a conversation. Use a hashtag to watch these conversations. 
  9. Tweet about something worth reading, listening to or watching. Mention why you are recommending it.
  10. Tweet about ideas and trends in your industry and their potential impact. This can be another interesting conversation starter.
Please share your ideas on tweeting. If you write blog posts, please tweet them and use #tweetideas as a hashtag.